Should I Stay or Should I Go?
How to Make That Crucial Job Move Decision

By Jim Bright
Pearson Education / Financial Times
December 2003
ISBN: 0-273-66301-1
162 Pages, 6 ¼" x 9 ¼"
$42.50 paper original


So, you've been headhunted for a new job, but you don't feel you've achieved all you can where you are right now? Or maybe you are thinking of quitting your permanent job to go freelance? Perhaps you're just completely bored and frustrated at work and wonder whether it's time to go all out to find another job. How on earth do you weight it all up? There's so much to work out, and this is such a familiar dilemma for many of us. But who do you turn to for advice?

What you need is impartial and authoritative guidance. Should I Stay, Should I Go? provides just this. It will help you work out where you are in your career, and whether it's time to head for the door or buckle down and work at moving up where you are. The book uses examples and checklists, to show you how to analyse your options logically and thoroughly and make the decision that's right for you.

Contents
Introduction Acknowledgements
Part One - Introduction So, what's your dilemma? Brief summary of the situations readers find themselves in and how this book will help. Inside and out: when to leave and when to stay Be noticed and relevant Big Idea: get away from thinking that career progression means working up through one company Plans, schemes, and surfing the waves Tips and models for evaluating your progress and goals How to capitalize on chance
Part Two – Recognising your situation Signs that it is time to leave your job Personal audit Organisational audit Signs that it is time to stay put Personal audit Organisational audit
Part Three – Mind games Recognising and conquering self-limiting talk Promises, delusions and head in sand syndrome Worries and doubts
Part Four – Staying Put Making your stay successful Getting promoted
Part Five – Making the move Planning for the big day Burning bridges and maintaining ties
Part Six – What happens if… I have second thoughts I realise I've made a bad move I get made redundant after moving I wish I'd moved after staying I don't get what I was promised

Reviews "...books such as this are unsettling but sometimes we need to be prodded to take a critical look at ourselves" Financial Times, June 03

Return to the Businesss Titles Home Page