Business Process Management
Strategic Integration in a Web-Enabled Environment
Management Briefings Executive Series


By Margaret May
Financial Times / Prentice Hall
December 2002
ISBN: 0-273-66108-6
280 Pages, Illustrated
$197.50 paper original


Today, more and more organizations are recognizing the opportunities that web technology can offer. They are using internet capability to extend their business processes beyond the traditional boundaries of their companies. By utilizing internet standards, services and applications, organizations are removing manual activity from their business processes, and are directly linking with their customers, suppliers and their partners, wherever they are. The resultant integration of the business community is transforming the structure and the culture of organizations, particularly in non-core areas such as finance.

Business Process Management: Integration in a web-enabled environment provides you with a practical briefing and explains what a web-enabled organization looks like and what is required to build and manage the necessary end-to-end processes. Discussing both the technology and the new practices, it offers practical guidance on how to analyze your existing business processes, how to re-engineer them and successful implementation, as well as the role of finance.

Essential reading for senior executives, this briefing will give you a thorough understanding of the opportunities and benefits, explaining how web-enabled business processes can transform the way your organization operates. Fully illustrated with leading edge examples from Cisco and Dell, plus original case studies including e-procurement at Unilever and successful ERP implementation at RNLI.

Contents Include

PART ONE: THE STRATEGIC BENEFITS OF COLLABORATIVE, WEB-ENABLED BUSINESS PROCESS MANAGEMENT

1.The strategic benefit of business community integration
The beginnings of collaborative commerce
The virtual organization
Partnerships
End-to-end business process management

2. E-business strategy
The web enabled organization
The public sector
Measurement of value and return on investment
Outsourcing and application service providers

PART TWO: TECHNOLOGICAL, FINANCIAL, LEGAL AND RISK MANAGEMENT CONSIDERATIONS

3. Web-enabling technology
The Internet and the Web
Intranets and extranets
Internet standards and protocols
Web services
Enterprise application integration
Data storage

4. Mobile and wireless technology
Introduction
Broadband (high-speed packet-based wireless)
Voice over packet networks
General packet radio service
Wireless application protocol
Messaging

5. Electronic invoicing and payments
Introduction
Electronic data interchange
Electronic invoice presentment and payment
E-treasury
Electronic bill presentment and payment

6. Statutory and risk management considerations
Introduction
Dynamic security policy
Physical and technical security tools
Industry standards
Statutory considerations

PART THREE:END-TO-END BUSINESS PROCESSES

7. Enterprise resource planning
Introduction
ERP has facilitated process management
Drivers for implementing ERP
Advantages of ERP
Problems encountered with ERP
ERP in the twenty-first century
Service process optimization
Electronic document management

8. Business to employee
Human resource management
E-recruitment
E-learning
Information management delivering business intelligence
Data quality and compatibility
Content management systems
Enterprise portals

9. Supply/demand chain management
Introduction
Supply/demand chain strategy
E-manufacturing
Front-end systems
Logistics
E-tailing
Consumer marketplaces

10. E-procurement
Introduction
Procurement models
E-marketplaces
Open standards

11. Customer relationship management and e-marketing
Introduction
Customer relationship management
CRM automation
Key benefits of CRM
Pointers to CRM success
E-marketing

PART FOUR: HOW TO ANALYSE, RE-ENGINEER AND MANAGE BUSINESS PROCESSES

12. Business process analysis
Introduction
Activity/process analysis methodology
Collection of activity/process information
Steps in building a process model

13. Activity/process-based costing
Introduction
Research
Signs of the need to review the costing system
How ABC differs from traditional costing
Choice of drivers
ABC example
Customer profitability
Process-based modelling

14. Business process performance improvement
Introduction
Activity classification
Activity-based cost management
Removal of constraints
Business process re-engineering

15. Change management
Introduction
Achieving successful change
How not to do it
Qualities of a change agent

16. Business process performance management
Introduction
Process-based budgeting
Objectives and responsibilities
Balanced performance measures and targets
Evaluation of alternative service levels
Priority-based budgeting
Process/activity-based monitoring and reporting

17. Process-based accounting and incorporating Six Sigma
Introduction
Forward-looking characteristics of processes
Ten bottom-line management guidelines for PBA
Steps for implementing PBA
Steps for operating PBA
A process-based performance measurement framework
The Six Sigma way
Knowledge transfer systems

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